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Tag: federal reserve conspiracy

What You Absolutely Need to Know About Money (Part 7) – Shah Gilani – Money Morning

By the start of the 1960s, banking in America was in a state of flux.

Boundaries were being blurred – especially those separating “commercial banks” and “investment banks” under Depression-era Glass-Steagall parameters. The banking landscape was shifting. In fact, it was about to go volcanic.

The Truman Administration had championed the break-up of bank cartel arrangements, whereby a powerful coterie of commercial-bank bond underwriters controlled how corporations financed debt and who got to distribute bond offerings. Subsequent regulatory changes (requiring bidding for underwriting assignments) broke up the “Gentleman Bankers Code,” which had been code for cartel.

A more competitive landscape drove banks to expand. Branch banking spread through shopping malls and onto prime locations on America’s Main Streets.

The hunt for deposits was on.

And it got ugly fast…

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The New Crisis Warning Just Issued to the Federal Reserve – Money Morning

Before the housing market crash, economists warned that record low-interest and mortgage rates were fueling a housing bubble.

Unfortunately, those fears were both overlooked and underestimated.

Now, an advisory council to the U.S. Federal Reserve is warning the Fed that its record $85 billon-a-month stimulus and ultra-low interest rates are fueling new bubbles in student loans and farmland.

“Recent growth in student-loan debt, to nearly $1 trillion, now exceeds credit-card outstandings and has parallels to the housing crisis,” according to minutes of the council’s Feb. 8 meeting.
In addition, “agricultural land prices are veering further from what makes sense,” the council said. “Members believe the run-up in agriculture land prices is a bubble resulting from persistently low interest rates.”

These warnings come from the Federal Advisory Council, a panel of 12 bankers chosen by the 12 Federal Reserve banks, which consults with and advises the Fed. Members of the council include the CEOs of Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS), State Street Corp. (NYSE: SST), BB&T Corp. (NYSE: BBT), Bank of Montreal (NYSE: BMO), Capital One Financial Corp. (NYSE: COF) , U.S. Bancorp (NYSE: USB) and the former CEO of PNC Financial Services (NYSE: PNC).

What’s more, the council warned the Fed in September that QE3 and its plan to buy bonds indefinitely would distort bond prices and have a limited impact on the economy and that “uncertain effects” will arise from the eventual unwinding of the balance sheet, including “risks to price and financial stability.”

So while Uncle Ben likes to remind us that the Fed will step in and take appropriate fiscal measures when necessary, the central bank’s own council believes the Fed’s actions are doing more harm than good.

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