Menu Close

Author: Greg Madison

Death Tax Woes: Don’t Make the Same Mistake Tony Soprano Did – Money Morning

We were all shocked by the sudden, untimely death of James Gandolfini. Gandolfini was an immensely gifted actor who changed the face of television entertainment in the role of Anthony “Tony” Soprano, a deeply troubled gangster-in-therapy, who had to balance obligations to his family… and his Family.

By all accounts, James Gandolfini was generous and kind to family and friends alike. It has been reported that he left a large legacy, in excess of $70 million, to be divided between them. His net worth is an estimate, and his asset inventory hasn’t yet been disclosed, but he did alright for a middle class kid from North Jersey.

Sadly, however, his nearest and dearest won’t see anywhere near the full amount he left behind.

It turns out that James Gandolfini was generous – to a fault. His wish was that his legacy, in the form of real estate and other assets in the United States and Italy, be distributed in large chunks, the largest in a trust for his 13-year old son, Michael and 8-month old daughter, Liliana. His widow, Deborah Lin, is set to receive 20% of his estate. The will stipulates that the shares to be doled out after taxes.

To continue reading, please click here…

Dark Pools of Liquidity Are a Big Problem for Free Markets – Money Morning

Everything runs on liquidity. Unless you know something I don’t, that dollar bill in your pocket is just as likely to buy a can of Pabst Blue Ribbon today as it was yesterday, and will be tomorrow.

Or you could sell 1,000 lbs. of gold – if you have that lying around – without fear of completely scuttling the global gold market. Your bank has to have cash, liquidity, lying around somewhere in the back if it wants to stay in business.

And in many cases, it’s easy to see or verify this liquidity. It helps everyone feel better about doing anything.

Big Problems: These Countries Are Facing Demographic Time Bombs – Money Morning

When a big economy hits the shoals, there are options.

You can take a Keynesian approach. You can take a Friedmanian approach. There are Bernankes, there are Nodas , the Austrian School, the Chicago School, expansion and contraction – however a government wants to play it, whatever the ideology, there are options and precedents for getting the economy going again.