Your Family Doc, Called AI…

This is a syndicated repost courtesy of True Economics. To view original, click here. Reposted with permission.

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In a recent post, I wrote about the AI breaching the key dimension of ‘intelligence’ – the ability to self-acquire information and self-replicate knowledge (see http://trueeconomics.blogspot.com/2017/10/221017-robot-builders-future-its-all.html).  And now, Chinese AI developers have created a robot that is capable of excelling at (not just passing) a medical certification exams: https://futurism.com/first-time-robot-passed-medical-licensing-exam/.

Years ago, working for IBM’s think tank, IBV, I recall discussions about the future potential applications for Watson. Aside from the obvious analytics involved in finance (my area), we considered the most feasible application for AI and language-based software in… err… that’s right: medicine. More precisely, as family doctors replacement. For now, Watson is toiling primarily in the family doctors’ support function, but truth is, there is absolutely no reason why AI cannot currently replace 90% of the family doctors’ practices.

And, while we are on the subject of AI, here is an interesting article on how China is beating the U.S. (and by extension the rest of the world) in the AI R&D game: https://futurism.com/china-could-soon-overtake-the-us-in-ai-development-former-google-ceo-says/ and https://futurism.com/china-has-overtaken-the-u-s-in-ai-research/.

Still scratching your heads, Stanford folks?..

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